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Showing Collections: 1 - 4 of 4

Carrie Burton Overton Oral History

 Item — Box: Individual Oral Histories Box 3: O-Si, Folder: 1
Identifier: LOH002299
Abstract Carrie Burton Overton served with the NAACP and in Democratic Party politics. She was also a Juilliard-trained musician and composer. She was interviewed in 1969 by history professor Philip Mason. The collection consists of interview recordings and transcript covering Overton's early life in Laramie, Wyoming, and her political and civil rights work, including her involvement with the NAACP and the "Colored Division" of the National Democratic Committee.
Dates: 1969-05-22

Folklore Archive: Student Field Projects Oral Histories

 Collection
Identifier: WSOH002714
Abstract The Folklore Archive, established in 1939 by WSU English professors Emlyn Gardner and Thelma James, contains the oldest and largest record of urban folk traditions in the United States. To document these traditions, Wayne State University students conducted field research projects that included oral history interviews. Collection consists of audio recordings of 55 interviews (or aggregations of multiple interviews on a single topic) conducted by student interviewer-collectors, some of which,...
Dates: 1961 - 1989; Majority of material found within 1968 - 1971

Kellogg African American Health Care Project Oral Histories

 Collection
Identifier: UOH001710
Abstract The Kellogg African American Health Care Project Oral Histories are the result of a project carried out by the University of Michigan's Historical Center for the Health Sciences, 1997-2000 (interviews conducted 1997-1998), and sponsored by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, to create and bring together resources relating to the African American health care experience in southeast Michigan from the 1940s through the 1960s. To this end, principal reseachers George Myers III and Ronald Amos and other...
Dates: 1997 - 1998

Untold Tales, Unsung Heroes Oral Histories

 Collection
Identifier: UOH001605
Abstract In 1989, the Detroit Urban League initiated a project to create an oral history of Detroit’s African American community, underrepresented in traditional histories of the city, focusing on the period of 1918 through 1967, from near the time of the League’s founding to the civil unrest of 1967. Elaine Latzman Moon, then on staff at the Detroit Urban League, led the project and interviewed more than 200 participants from all walks of life, ages, and social and economic status, including many...
Dates: 1990 - 1994