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David Mackenzie Papers

 Collection
Identifier: WSP000480
The papers of David Mackenzie reflect his role as an educator, in particular as Dean of the Detroit Junior College and the College of the City of Detroit, as well as his interest and use of poetry in teaching, and to a lesser degree his involvement in the national junior college movement.

Series Description: Series 1, 1916-1926 Correspondence to and from David Mackenzie relating to his administrative responsibilities as Dean of the Detroit Junior College and the College of the City of Detroit from 1916 to 1926. The files include material on subjects such as building construction and repair, equipment, departments, hiring of faculty, relationships with high schools, student activities, student transfers to the Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery and University of Michigan College of Dental Surgery, and establishing DJC and CCD. Faculty material is found not only in "Faculty" files but also in the Frank Cody files. Information relating to departments is also found in the "Faculty" files. Material on equipment and supplies is found in "Equipment" and John Thomas'files. Also included is a 1904 letter to Mackenzie, postcards (1925) and a 1932 David Mackenzie High School commencement program sent to Mrs. Mackenzie. It should be noted that some records have unsigned penciled notations on them. In general, these were written by Leslie L. Hanawalt, author of the history of Wayne State University. If there is any doubt as to the author of the notations, contact the archivist.

Series 2, 1882-1906 Series II contains Mackenzie's poetry for elementary and secondary school classes, college essays, educational material and notes, and political papers for 1882 to 1906. There is also a student notebook of 40 poems selected by Mackenzie for use in English classes at Central High School, 1912-1917. It should be noted that some records have unsigned penciled notations on them. In general, these were written by Leslie L. Hanawalt, author of the histroy of Wayne State University. If there is any doubt as to the author of the notations, contact the archivist.

Dates

  • 1882 - 1926

Creator

Language of Materials

Material entirely in English.

Access

Collection is open for research.

Use

Refer to the Walter P. Reuther Library Rules for Use of Archival Materials.

Extent

3.5 Linear Feet (7 MB)

Abstract

Born in Detroit’s Corktown in 1860, David Mackenzie attended Detroit’s Capital High School, graduating from University of Michigan in 1881. He served as superintendent of schools in Flint, Michigan in 1888, then transferred to Muskegon, Michigan in 1892, accepting the position of principal of Detroit Central High School in 1903. It was Mackenzie who enabled a one-year college level premedical curriculum to be offered in 1913 at Central High School, making it possible for Detroit students to study medicine in their hometown. Mackenzie proposed a two-year Junior College curriculum to the Michigan Legislature in 1916, which approved, officially creating the Detroit Junior College in 1917. The collection reflects Mackenzie’s administrative career in Detroit and provides course material for his role as instructor. His involvement in the Junior College Movement is also included in the collection.

History

David Mackenzie, a founder of the Detroit Junior College and the College of the City of Detroit, was born in Detroit on May 28, 1860. He attended Detroit High School (Capital High) and graduated from the University of Michigan in 1881 with M.A. and a teaching certificate. Mackenzie became superintendent of schools in Flint in 1888 and then in Muskegon from 1892 to 1903. By the time he became principal of Detroit's Central High in 1904, he was a well known educator. Under Mackenzie's direction a one year college level premedical curriculum was offered in 1913 at Central High School. It was the first junior college curriculum organized in Michigan. By the fall of 1916, with an enrollment of 96, Mackenzie proposed extending the course to two years. The Michigan legislature approved the two year curriculum and authorized the Detroit Junior College in 1917. Mackenzie served as Principal of the College and the High School until 1919. In that year his title changed to Dean of the Detroit Junior College and Principal of the Central High School. He became a leader in the national junior college movement and was elected the first president of the American Association of Junior Colleges in 1920.

The movement to make Detroit Junior College into a four year institution began in 1918. The Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery needed affiliation with a degree granting institution. Evening classes and summer school started in 1919. The Junior College became the third largest institution in the state, outranked only by the University of Michigan and Michigan Agricultural College. Finally in 1923 the Junior College was elevated to full degree status and renamed the College of the City of Detroit (CCD). The Central High School building continued to house both high school and CCD students during the day. In the building at night were 600 students who attended high school, 500 college as well as 18 rooms full of extension people from Detroit Teachers College and a large number enrolled in the University of Michigan's Extension courses. Mackenzie was Dean of the College of the City of Detroit from its inception in 1923 until his death in 1926.

Arrangement

Arranged in 2 series – Series 1 (Box 1-5) and Series 2 (Box 5-7). Files in Series 1 are in alphabetical order. Material in each folder is in chronological order.

Processing History

Processed and finding aid written by Walter P. Reuther Library.
Title
Guide to the David Mackenzie Papers
Status
completed
Author
Processed by Walter P. Reuther Library.
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English

Repository Details

Part of the Walter P. Reuther Library Repository

Contact:
5401 Cass Avenue
Detroit MI 48202 USA