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CIO Office of the Secretary-Treasurer Records

 Collection
Identifier: LR000185
Part I: Files of James Carey

Series 1: Correspondence Letters received, copies of letters sent, telegrams, invitations, reports, and newspaper clippings. Most of the correspondence is arranged alphabetically. At the end of the series, there is one box of correspondence of public officials. This correspondence is divided into two sections - U.S. and state public officials and public officials of foreign countries. The correspondence of the second section is arranged alphabetically by name of state, but the entries have been summarized on the guide.

Series 2: Non-CIO Organizations, 1937-1955 Correspondence, press releases, minutes and reports. The records in this series are arranged alphabetically. Much of the correspondence pertains to requests for contributions, invitations to be on lecture panels, and other routine business. Some of the records consist of miscellaneous reports and of minutes of board meetings.

Series 3: U.S. Government, 1941-1955 The records of this series include the records of government departments as well as records of the Senate and House of Representatives. The series is arranged alphabetically by name of government department. The records consist of business correspondence, press releases, minutes, and reports.

Series 4: CIO Unions Correspondence, press releases, reports and legal evidence. The records of this series are arranged alphabetically.

Series 5: Office of the President: United Electrical Workers and United Packinghouse Workers. 1935-1953 Correspondence, reports, minutes, election returns, and published material. They pertain to the United Electrical Workers, the United Packinghouse Workers, and to raiding results between AFL and CIO Unions. The records of this series were created by the Office of the President, not by the Secretary-Treasurer.

Series 6: CIO Offices, Departments, and Employees Correspondence, reports, and Congressional testimony. The records of this series are divided into three subseries:

Subseries A: Contains the records of the President, the Executive Vice-President and the Secretary-Treasurer.

Subseries B: Contains the records of the CIO Departments.

Subseries C: Contains records pertaining to CIO Employees.

Series 7: CIO Standing Committees, 1940 – 1955 , bulk 1946-1955 Correspondence, reports, minutes, press releases, and newspaper clippings. They are arranged alphabetically.

Series 8: CIO Conventions and AFL-CIO Unity Material, 1937-1955 Besides the usual convention material, this series contains correspondence, reports and resolutions pertaining to AFL-CIO Unity Conferences of 1937 to 1942, and also the correspondence pertaining to CIO Executive Board meetings of 1939 to 1940. The Convention material is arranged chronologically by year of convention, and it pertains to the CIO conventions of 1938 to 1940 and 1948 to 1954 as well as to the AFL-CIO Convention of 1955. The records of the 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, and 1947 conventions are missing, although the published proceedings and resolutions of the 1943 and 1944 are in the collection. There was no convention in 1945. The records consist of correspondence, reports and resolutions, press releases, newspaper clippings and published material. At the end of this series, there are four scrapbooks of photographs, and two scrapbooks of newspaper clippings.

Series 9: Regional Offices and Industrial Union Councils. 1937-1955 In order to unite and coordinate all the CIO organizations within each city, county and state, Regional Offices and Industrial Union Councils were established. They were governed by rules and regulations formulated by the Executive Board and were under the supervision of the Executive Vice-President. Prior to 1953, most states maintained one regional office. In 1953, there was a re-organization, and the regional offices were limited to thirteen. Each regional office covered the territory of two or more states. There were 41 state and 247 city and county industrial union councils. The records in this series are divided into three subseries:

Subseries A: Regional Offices The records of Subseries A are further divided into two sub-subseries: Sub-subseries 1: Regional Offices, 1937-1953 Arranged alphabetically Sub-subseries 2: Regional Offices, 1953-55 Arranged numerically, I-XII. There are no records for Region XIII.

Subseries B: State Industrial Union Councils The records of subseries B are arranged alphabetically.

Subseries C: City and County Industrial Union Councils. The records of Subseries C are further divided into two sub-subseries: Sub-subseries 1: City Arranged alphabetically. Sub-subseries 2: County. The records are arranged alphabetically.

Series 10: Hearings on Communist Activities of CIO Unions by the CIO Executive Board Correspondence, reports, testimony, minutes, transcripts, newspaper clippings, and published Congressional reports. The records of this series are divided into two subseries:

Subseries A: Hearings, 1949 -1950 The records are arranged alphabetically.

Subseries B: Hearings, 1953-United Packinghouse Workers At the end of the series, there are three published reports of Congressional hearings about communist activity in labor unions, 1952 to 1953.

Series 11: International Affairs Department The records in this series cover the period from 1939 to 1955. The series is divided into seven subseries:

Subseries A: World Federation of Trade Unions, 1943-1949 The records of Subseries A consist of correspondence, reports, minutes of meetings, press releases, newspaper clippings and published material. They pertain to the meetings of the World Federation of Trade Unions, to the W.F.T.U. and the European Recovery Program and to the withdrawal of the CIO from the W.F.T.U.

Subseries B: International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, 1949-1955 The records of Subseries B consist of correspondence, reports, press releases, newspaper clippings, and published material. They pertain to the activity of the CIO at the European and Latin American meetings of the I.C.F.T.U.

Subseries C: Economic Cooperation Administration and the European Recovery Program The records of Subseries C pertain to the activity of the CIO in the administration of the European Recovery Program. According to the Economics Co-operation Act of 1948, the ERP was administered by the Economic Co-operation Administration. As part of the administration, a Public Advisory Board was created. This Board consisted of U.S. citizens who consulted with, and advised the administrator with respect to general or basic policy matters of the ERP. James Carey was a member of the Public Advisory Board. The CIO also participated in the administration of the ERP through the Labor Division of the ECA which was established by the administrator. The staff of the Labor Division consisted of labor union officers or members who were chosen for short periods to perform special duties for the Administrator. The records in this section cover the period from 1947 to 1951. They consist of correspondence, reports, minutes, press releases, and published material.

Subseries D: Mutual Security Administration and the European Recovery Program The records of Subseries D are a continuation of the records in Subseries C. In 1951 the Administration of the ERP was put under the Mutual Security Administration, and the emphasis of the European Recovery Program was upon building up the military strength of the NATO countries, rather than providing them with assistance. The records of this section cover the period from 1951 to 1953. They consist of correspondence, reports, minutes, press releases, and published material. The reports and minutes of the Public Advisory Board continue through January 1953.

Subseries E: Labor Committee of the Foreign Operations Administration, 1953-1955 The records of Subseries E are a continuation of the records in Subseries D. The Foreign Operations Administration was created on August 1, 1953 as a result of President Eisenhower's Reorganization Plan No. 7. Four agencies including the Mutual Security Administration were combined under the Foreign Operations Administration. The Labor Committee was comprised of U.S. labor leaders appointed by the Director to advise and to consult with him concerning the programs and policies of the Foreign Operations Committee. They consist of reports, memoranda and published material.

Subseries F: Office File, 1939-1955 Subseries F contains records called "office file", a group of records pertaining to miscellaneous topics of the International Affairs Department which are arranged alphabetically. Besides the correspondence, there are records pertaining to European and Latin American Trips of CIO officials and newspaper clippings pertaining to miscellaneous topics.

Subseries G: Published Material Subseries G contains published material pertaining to international affairs. Much of this material consists of small books and pamphlets pertaining to various subjects. The material is placed in folders and is arranged alphabetically.

Series 12: Speeches and Press Releases of James Carey The records of this series consist of the speeches and press releases of James Carey. The series is divided into two subseries:

Subseries A: Speeches

Subseries B: Press Releases The records of part one cover the period from 1938 to 1955, and they consist of rough drafts of speeches, typewritten speeches, and published speeches. The rough drafts of speeches and typewritten speeches are arranged chronologically. The published speeches are placed after the drafts and typewritten speeches. The records of part two cover the period from 1943 to 1955 and they consist of press releases which are arranged chronologically.

Series 13: Office Files Correspondence, reports, minutes, and newspaper clippings. This series contains a group of records pertaining to miscellaneous topics which are arranged alphabetically.
Part II:

Series 14: United Transportation Service Employees Union 1942-1954 Correspondence, minutes, grievance records testimony, press releases, financial statements and speeches pertaining to executive board and staff meetings; contract and wage negotiations; agreements, conventions; and local unions.

Series 15: CIO and AFL-CIO Assistant Secretary-Treasurer The records of this series are broken into seven subseries. With the exception of sub-series C, the records of these subseries are split into two chronological sections. In each first section are records dated from 1943 until approximately 1950, the date on which Weaver took a leave of absence to work for the National Security Resources Board. Each second section contains his CIO records, 1950-1952, as well as the records he created during his second period with the CIO, 1953-1958.

Subseries 15A: Non CIO Organizations and Individuals 1941-52 Correspondence, press releases, minutes, reports, and published material. The records are arranged alphabetically. As assistant to James Carey, Weaver answered some of the correspondence which Carey received as a member of the board of directors of various organizations. Most of this correspondence pertains to requests for contributions, to invitations to be on lecture panels, and to other routine business. Some reports, minutes, press releases, and published material are interspersed with the correspondence. Most of the organizations described in this subseries are concerned with civil rights.

Subseries 15B: Non-CIO and Non-AFL-CIO Organizations and Individuals, 1949-1959 Correspondence, press releases, minutes of meetings, and reports. The records of this sub-series are arranged alphabetically. It should be pointed out that twenty-eight folders in this sub-series contain records pertaining to AFL-CIO unity. Most of the records in this subseries are dated 1952 - February 1958. However, there are seven folders of the National Planning Association which are dated March 1958 - December 1959. Most of the organizations described in this series are concerned with civil rights.

Subseries 15C: U.S. Government 1943-57 The records of this sub-series are divided into four sections: 1)Departments, 2) House of Representatives, 3) Senate and 4) Democratic National Committee. Section one contains records pertaining to government departments or agencies, and it is arranged alphabetically by name of government department. The records consist of correspondence, press releases and reports. Section two contains records pertaining to the House of Representatives, and it is arranged alphabetically. There are only five folders in this section. Most of the records are correspondence. Section three contains records pertaining to the Senate, and it is arranged alphabetically. There are only fourteen folders in this section. The records consist of correspondence, reports and press releases. Section four contains records pertaining to the Democratic National Committee. There are only three folders in this section.

Subseries 15D: CIO Unions 1943-1951 The records of this sub-series consist of correspondence, reports, and press releases. They are arranged alphabetically by name of union.

Subseries 15E: CIO and AFL-CIO Unions, 1950-57 The records of this sub-series consist of correspondence, reports, and press releases. They are arranged alphabetically by name of union.

Subseries 15F: CIO Departments, Committees and Conventions, 1943-49 The records in this sub-series are divided into three parts: 1) Departments and Offices 2) Committees and 3) Conventions. The records of part one consist of correspondence, press releases, and re- ports. They are arranged alphabetically by name of department or office. The records of part two consist of correspondence, press releases, and re- ports. They are arranged alphabetically by name of committee. There are only eight folders in this part. The records of part three consist of correspondence, press releases, reports, resolutions, and lists. They are arranged chronologically by year of Convention.

Subseries 15G: CIO and AFL-CIO Departments, Committees, Conventions and Executive Board The records of this sub-series are divided into four parts: 1) Departments, 2) Committees, 3) Conventions and 4) Executive Board Meetings. The records of section one consist of correspondence, reports, and press releases. They are arranged alphabetically. The records of section two consist of correspondence, reports, and press releases. They are arranged alphabetically. The records of section three consist of correspondence, reports, resolutions, and lists. They are arranged chronologically. The records of section four consist of correspondence, reports, press re- leases, and minutes. They are arranged chronologically.

Series 16: CIO and AFL-CIO Civil Rights Committee As the introduction indicates, the records of this series are divided into five sub-series.

Subseries 16A: Members of Civil Rights Committee The records of this sub-series pertain to the members of the Civil Rights Committee. Most of the records consist of correspondence; there are some reports and press releases. After three folders of general correspondence, the records are arranged alphabetically by the surnames of the members. At the end of the series, there is one folder of miscellaneous membership lists.

Subseries 16B: CIO Civil Rights Conferences; CIO and AFL-CIO Civil Rights Committee Meetings; and Reports of the Director The records of this sub-series are divided into three sections: 1) CIO Civil Rights Conferences 2) CIO and AFL-CIO Civil Rights Committee Meetings and 3) Reports of the Director. The records of part one pertain to the Civil Rights Conferences of 1948, 1950, and 1952. The records are arranged chronologically by date of conference. They consist of correspondence, reports, press releases, speeches, and minutes. The records of part two pertain to Civil Rights Committee Meetings. They cover the period from 1953 to 1957. After two folders of general correspondence, the records are arranged chronologically by date of meetings. The records consist of minutes and correspondence. The records of part three are the reports of the Director of the Civil Rights Committee. They consist of reports and drafts of reports, and are arranged chronologically.

Subseries 16C: Civil Rights Programs of States and Cities The records of this sub-series pertain to State, City, and County Industrial Union Councils. The Civil Rights Committee persuaded the Industrial Union Councils to begin local civil rights programs, aimed at getting employers to write non-discrimination clauses into collective bargaining agreements. The records of this subseries consist of correspondence and reports. They are arranged alphabetically by name of state.

Subseries 16D: National Civil Rights Program Correspondence, reports, press releases, Congressional testimony, speeches, and drafts of articles. One of the responsibilities of the Civil Rights Committee was to focus attention on the achievements of the United States in protecting its heritage of civil liberties and in pointing out its shortcomings and mistakes. The Civil Rights Committee became the spokesman of the CIO in promoting the principle of racial equality. The records of this series pertain to the political lobbying activities of the Civil Rights Committee in its attempt to establish a national civil rights program. Some of the lobbying was directed at national non-government organizations and at state, city, and local governments, but most of the lobbying was concentrated at the federal government. The records of this sub-series are arranged alphabetically. Within this arrangement, there are two categories - Civil Rights Cases and federal and state governments lobbying.

Subseries 16E: Published Material on Civil Rights The records of this sub-series consist of published material on civil rights. This published material pertains only to the civil rights of minority groups and especially to the Negro. It does not pertain to questions of civil liberties such as freedom of speech, press or religion. There are nine folders of published material on civil liberties in series 20 of this collection. The published material in sub-series 16E consists of articles, pamphlets, books, hearings on congressional committees and drafts of congressional acts. The material is arranged alphabetically according to topics.

Series 17: National Security Resources Board and Reconstruction Finance Committee Correspondence, reports, press releases, notes on telephone conversations, newspaper clippings and published material. The records of this series are divided into sections - National Security Resources Board and Reconstruction Finance Committee. The records of each section are arranged alphabetically.

Series 18: Political Campaigns of Stuart Symington Correspondence, speeches, notes on television conversations, and news- paper clippings. The records of this series are arranged in three sections - Senate campaign, 1952, correspondence and speeches, 1953-60, and Presidential Primary, 1960. Most of the correspondence is between Symington and Weaver. There are no other important correspondents in this series.

Series 19: International Electrical Workers Union As the introduction indicates, the records of this series are divided into two sub-series. Correspondents include Charles Diggs, James McDevitt, William Oliver, and William Praxiniere.

Subseries 19A: Director of IUE Committee on Political Education 1957-1959 The records of this sub-series consist of correspondence, reports, press releases, minutes and newspaper clippings. They are arranged alphabetically. There are eleven folders of graphs of contribution quotas which are placed at the end of the subseries.

Subseries 19B: Records as a Delegate to International Conferences The records of this sub-section are divided into three sections - 1) Atlantic Conference 2) World Federation of United Nations Associations Conference and 3) NATO Parliamentarians Conference. The records of section one pertain to the Atlantic Conference which met in June, 1959. The records consist of correspondence, reports, press releases, lists of delegates, newspaper clippings and published material. The records of section two pertain to the World Federation of United Nations Conference which met in September, 1959. The records consist of correspondence, reports, press releases and lists of delegates. In addition, there are six folders containing the published Provisional Records of the International Labor Conference for 1957. The records of section three pertain to the NATO Parliamentarians Conference which met in November, 1959. There is only one folder of records concerning this Conference.

Series 20: Published Material and Photographs The records in this series consist of the published material found in the second half of the CIO Collection. It should be pointed out that the published material pertaining to civil rights is in sub-series 16E. The published material in series 20 covers a variety of topics. The published material is arranged alphabetically. At the end of the Collection, there are three boxes of photographs.
Part III: This addition to the CIO Secretary-Treasurer Collection contains papers from the offices of James Carey. The vast majority of the material was created by Mr. Carey in his position as CIO Secretary-Treasurer, although there is a small portion which relate more specifically to his role in the IUE. The bulk of this part of the collection contains speeches given by Mr. Carey in the early 1950s; minutes from CIO and AFL-CIO International Executive Board meetings; unofficial minutes and notes from CIO Vice-President's meetings; materials relating to CIO anti-communism; and other various materials relating to his duties as CIO Secretary-Treasurer.

Dates

  • 1935 - 1960

Creator

Access

Collection is open for research.

Use

Refer to the Walter P. Reuther Library Rules for Use of Archival Materials. Restrictions: Researchers may encounter records of a sensitive nature – personnel files, case records and those involving investigations, legal and other private matters. Privacy laws and restrictions imposed by the Library prohibit the use of names and other personal information which might identify an individual, except with written permission from the Director and/or the donor.

Extent

137 Linear Feet (238 MB, 18 SB, 7 scrapbooks)

Abstract

Part 1 contains James B. Carey records, secretary-treasurer of the CIO from 1938 to 1955. Mr. Carey served as chairman of the CIO Civil Rights Committee and secretary-treasurer of the Philip Murray Memorial Foundation. He was the CIO representative to many international conferences, held a number of advisory positions with U.S. government agencies, and was on the executive boards of many private organizations. The topics cover a wide range of CIO activities. Among these are attempts to reunite the AFL and the CIO from 1937 to 1942 and again in 1955; Harry Bridges; communism in the labor movement; financial affairs of the CIO; International Confederation of Free Trade Unions and World Federation of Trade Unions; disputes within electrical workers' unions; CIO and Latin America; labor in World War II; anti-communism, and political action. Correspondents include nearly every major labor figure for the period.

Part 2 contains George L.P. Weaver records. In addition to serving as assistant secretary-treasurer of the CIO, he also held at various times the positions of assistant to the president of the United Transportation Service Employees Union; director of the ClO's Civil Rights Committee; assistant to the chairman of the National Security Resources Board; and member of the Committee to Reorganize the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. Mr. Weaver also played leading roles in the senatorial and presidential campaigns of Stuart Syrnington. In addition to labor topics, the Weaver papers cover Americans for Democratic Action; civil rights; Atlantic Conference of 1959; tin missions to Bolivia and southeast Asia (1951-52); housing; defense; manpower; McCarran-Walter Immigration Bill; NAACP; and the Taft-Hartley Act.

Part 3 contains records from the office of James Carey. In addition to material relating to his tenure as Secretary-Treasurer, there are some records relating to his role in the IUE. Topics covered include: UE; anti-Communism; expulsion of left-led unions from CIO; and HUAC.

Biographical / Historical

Part I: Files of James Carey

James B. Carey was born on August 12, 1911 at Philadelphia. He received his education at St. Theresa's parochial School, and at the public high school of Glassboro, New Jersey. He later took training at the Drexel Institute and at the University of Pennsylvania in engineering, in management of industrial enterprise, and in financial and business forecasting.

His first full-time position was with the Philco radio laboratory in Philadelphia. When, on July 15, 1933, Philco signed its first union contract, Carey was elected president of the newly founded American Federation of Radio Workers which was chartered by the AFL as Federal Union 18368. In December 1933, at the first convention of local unions in the radio and electrical industry, he was elected national president, and he headed a delegation which appeared before the AFL Executive Council to request a national charter.

The AFL refused to grant this request. Two and one-half years later, after prolonged and fruitless negotiations, the representatives of the radio workers established a new national union, the United Electrical and Radio Workers, they elected Carey President, and they voted to affiliate with the CIO.

Charles P. Howard died in 1938, and was replaced by Carey as elected Secretary-Treasurer of the CIO at the 1938 Convention, a position which he held until the merger with the AFL in 1956. When the CIO Civil Rights Committee was established in 1942, he was appointed Chairman. In 1953, he was named secretary-treasurer of the Philip Murray Memorial Foundation.

Soon after his appointment as Secretary-Treasurer, Carey became interested in foreign affairs. In 1939 he was a CIO delegate to the Second Labor Conference of the American States. After World War II, he frequently represented the CIO at international conferences. He was an associate consultant at the founding United Nations Conference for International Organization held from April to June, 1945. He was secretary of the CIO delegation to the London Conference which was called in 1945 under the auspices of the British Trade Union Conference to establish the World Federation of Trade Unions. After the CIO withdrew from the WFTU, he participated in a number of conferences which resulted in the formation of the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, and he was named the first substitute member from North America on the ICFTU Executive Board. In addition, Carey participated in the administration of the European Recovery Program, 1948-53 as a labor consultant on the Public Advisory Board of the Economic Co-operation Administration.

Besides his participation in foreign affairs, he held a number of advisory positions with the U.S. government. In 1941 President Roosevelt appointed him to the Production Planning Board of the Office of Production Management, to the National Defense Mediation Board, and to the National War Labor Board.

In 1947, President Truman appointed him to the President's Committee on Foreign Aid, and to the President's Committee on Labor Management. Carey also represented the CIO on the executive boards of a number of private organizations, including American Association for the United Nations; Americans for Democratic Action; Food for Freedom Incorporated; International Training Administration; National Committee for a Free Europe; National Conference of Christians and Jews; National Planning Association; Harry S. Truman Library; Union for Democratic Action; United World Federalists; and Workers Defense League.
Part II: Files of George L-P Weaver

The records of this chapter are concerned with the career of George Leon Paul Weaver, who was the Assistant Secretary-Treasurer of the CIO. Most of the records described pertain to the CIO, but some relate to other aspects of the career of Weaver.

In 1940, Weaver joined the United Transportation Service Employees Union and was elected a member of the grievance committee of Chicago Local 1000. In 1943, he was appointed the International Representative for the Washington, D.C. area, and in 1944 he was appointed Assistant to the President. Weaver's duties included processing grievance cases, servicing local unions, and presiding over elections and hearings. He continued to work for the UTSE until 1950, eventhough he had been appointed to positions with the national CIO.

In 1942, the CIO Executive Board established the Civil Rights Committee and appointed Weaver as its Director. As Director, much of his work involved assisting the national Secretary-Treasurer, and in 1945 he was officially appointed Assistant Secretary-Treasurer. He held these positions simultaneously until 1950. The duties consisted of preparing testimony and testifying before Congressional committees, of representing the Secretary-Treasurer before federal agencies, and of delivering speeches on behalf of the CIO. In addition, he fulfilled field assignments for the CIO unions. This work involved participating in contract negotiations and in processing grievance cases.

On October 24, 1950, Weaver was granted a two year leave of absence to serve as Assistant to the Chairman of the U.S. National Security Resources Board, which had been established by the National Security Act of 1947. This Board is composed of a chairman and of other members who are directors of government executive departments. In 1950, Stuart Symington was Chairman. The major function of the Board is to advise the President of the United States concerning the coordination of military, industrial, and civilian mobilization in the event of a war and to suggest policies concerning the utilization of manpower and resources. As Assistant to the Chairman, Weaver performed a variety of tasks, but he worked mainly in the area of manpower mobilization, especially as it concerned the Negro and organized labor.

In April, 1951, President Truman appointed Symington chairman of a committee to make recommendations for the reorganization of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. Weaver was appointed a member of this committee and on June 15, Symington appointed him as the senior RFC member of a mixed RFC and State Department committee to determine the cost factor incident to the production of tin in Bolivia. To perform this mission, the committee made two trips to Bolivia. In October, Weaver represented the RFC on a similar tin mission to Malaya, Indonesia, and Thailand. He was also one of the representatives of the United States on the committee that negotiated tin agreements with Great Britain, Indonesia, Thailand, Bolivia, and Belgium. From April, 1952 until August, Weaver worked on the Senatorial campaign staff of Stuart Symington. In August he returned to the National Security Resources Board as a consultant to work on a project for increasing the transportation system in South America.

This assignment was completed in December, and in January, 1953, he returned to the CIO as Assistant Secretary-Treasurer. Weaver stayed with the CIO until the merger in 1955. According to the merger agreement, the original staff members of the AFL and of the CIO were retained until a special committee made an equitable provision for the integration of the two staffs. Accordingly, he worked for the AFL-CIO until February, 1958.

In April, 1958, Weaver accepted a position with the International Union of Electrical Workers. He was Director of the Committee of Political Education. Between June, 1959 and November, while still employed by the IUE, he was a United States delegate at three international conferences - the Atlantic Conference, the World Federation of United Nations Association, and the NATO Parliamentarians Conference. The Atlantic Conference and the NATO Parliamentiarians Conference were sponsored by the countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and were called to discuss the problems of NATO. The conference of the World Federation of the United Nations was one of a series of annual conferences. At this conference, there were several sessions pertaining to the International Labor Organization.

When Weaver returned from these conferences, he worked on the 1960 presidential nomination committee for Stuart Symington.

Arrangement

Part I:

Arranged in 13 series – series 1 (Boxes 1-4), Series 2 (Boxes 5-36), Series 3 (Boxes 37-49), Series 4 (Boxes 49-61), Series 5 (Boxes 62-67), Series 6 (Boxes 68-79), Series 7 (Boxes 79-88), Series 8 (Boxes 89-103), Series 9 (Boxes 104-108), Series 10 (Boxes 108-114), Series 11 (Boxes 115-134), Series 12 (Boxes 135-141), and Series 13 (Boxes 141-142). Folders are arranged alphabetically unless otherwise noted below.

Series 6 is further divided into three subseries. Series 8 is arranged chronologically. Series 9 is further divided into three subseries. Series 10 is further divided into two subseries. Series 11 is further divided into seven subseries. Series 12 is further divided into two subseries, both of which are arranged chronologically.
Part II:

Arranged in 7 series – series 14 (Boxes 143-146), Series 15 (Boxes 147-187), Series 16 (Boxes 188-218), Series 17 (Boxes 219-225), Series 18 (Boxes 225-228), Series 19 (Boxes 228-234), and Series 20 (Boxes 234-238). Folders are arranged alphabetically unless otherwise noted below.

Series 15 is further divided into seven subseries, each of which (except for subseries C) are further divided into two chronological sections. Series 16 is further divided into five subseries. The second subseries is further divided into three sections, all of which are arranged chronologically. Series 19 is further divided into two subseries.
Part III: Folders are arranged chronologically by record type.

Acquisition

Parts I and II: The files of the Secretary-Treasurer office of the CIO were deposited with the Archives of Labor History and Urban Affairs in April 1966 by Walter Reuther.

Transfers

Part III: CIO Convention Proceedings and serials have been transferred to the Archives Library. In addition, a small assortment of photographs and one large scrapbook has been placed in the Audio-Visual Collection.

Processing History

Processed and finding aid written by Walter P. Reuther Library.
Title
CIO Office of the Secretary-Treasurer Records
Status
completed
Author
Processed by Walter P. Reuther Library.
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English

Repository Details

Part of the Walter P. Reuther Library Repository

Contact:
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Detroit MI 48202 USA