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Folklore Archive: Studies and Research Projects Records

 Collection
Identifier: WSR001731
The Folklore Archive: Studies and Research Projects Records contains scholarly papers documenting Greek-American family life and the migration of Southern Appalachian whites to the metropolitan Detroit area.

Transcripts complemented by audio recordings are so indicated in the inventory. Greek-American Family project oral histories, 1983-84, listed by family name all have recordings available in the Folklore Archive: Greek-American Family Life Oral Histories, unless otherwise noted.

Dates

  • 1968 - 1995

Creator

Language of Materials

Material entirely in English.

Access

Collection is open for research.

Use

Refer to the Walter P. Reuther Library Rules for Use of Archival Materials. Refer to the Walter P. Reuther Library Rules for Use of Archival Materials. Restrictions: Researchers may encounter records of a sensitive nature – personnel files, case records and those involving investigations, legal and other private matters. Privacy laws and restrictions imposed by the Library prohibit the use of names and other personal information which might identify an individual, except with written permission from the Director and/or the donor.

Extent

2 Linear Feet (2 SB)

Abstract

The Folklore Archive, established in 1939, contains the oldest and largest record of urban folk traditions in the United States. To document these traditions, Wayne State University students conducted field research projects covering a broad range of topics. The archive is strong in modern industrial and occupational folklore, reflecting the rich ethnic diversity and work-oriented heritage of Detroit and southeastern Michigan. The Folklore Archive: Studies and Research Projects Records contain transcripts and research studies related to Greek-American family life, Southern upland migrant folk culture, traditional medical beliefs and American folk music.

History

The Folklore Archive, established in 1939 by WSU English professors Emlyn Gardner and Thelma James and contains the oldest and largest record of urban folk traditions in the United States. To document these traditions, Wayne State University students conducted field research projects covering a broad range of topics. The archive is strong in modern industrial and occupational folklore, reflecting the rich ethnic diversity and work-oriented heritage of Detroit and southeastern Michigan.

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by project title.

Acquisition

Selected materials from the Wayne State University Folklore Archive were transferred to the Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs in July of 1999 by the Archive’s director, Professor Janet Langlois.

Related Materials

Folklore Archive Collections: Bruce L. Harkness Poletown Photographs, Student Field Projects Oral Histories, Student Field Projects Records, Student Field Projects Photographs Greek-American Family Life Oral Histories, Southern Upland Folklife in the Midwest Oral Histories. Materials of Prof. Ellen Stekert in WSU English Department Records, WSR000451.

Transfers

A number of reel-to-reel and cassette audiotapes of oral interviews have been transferred to the Archives Audiovisual Department (see related materials note). A microfilm copy of a Master’s thesis by Margaret T. Buchanan entitled “Migration of Workers from Tennessee to Michigan” has been placed in the Archives Library.

Processing History

Processed and finding aid written by Walter P. Reuther Library in March 2000. Revised in 2019 by Deborah Rice.
Title
Guide to the Folklore Archive: Studies and Research Projects Records
Status
completed
Author
Processed by Walter P. Reuther Library.
Date
2000-03
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English

Revision Statements

  • 2019-07-08: Description edited to reflect new arrangement.

Repository Details

Part of the Walter P. Reuther Library Repository

Contact:
5401 Cass Avenue
Detroit MI 48202 USA