Skip to main content

Joe Felmet Papers

 Collection
Identifier: LP001507

Scope and Content

His papers consist of articles and personal remembrances of his civil rights and free-speech activism and copies of FBI files on the WDL.

Important Subjects: Congress of Racial Equality; Fellowship of Reconciliation (U.S.); Journey of Reconciliation, 1947; National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; Workers’ Defense League

Important Names: Houser, George; Houston, Charles; Lynn, Conrad; Marshall, Thurgood; Peck, James; Rustin, Bayard; Watts, Rowland; Worthy, William

Dates

  • 1944 - 1993

Creator

Language of Materials

Material entirely in English.

Access

Collection is open for research.

Use

Refer to the Walter P. Reuther Library Rules for Use of Archival Materials. Refer to the Walter P. Reuther Library Rules for Use of Archival Materials. Restrictions: Researchers may encounter records of a sensitive nature – personnel files, case records and those involving investigations, legal and other private matters. Privacy laws and restrictions imposed by the Library prohibit the use of names and other personal information which might identify an individual, except with written permission from the Director and/or the donor.

History

Joe Felmet participated in the first “freedom ride” of the civil rights movement. This 1947 trip, known as the “Journey of Reconciliation,” was meant to test the Supreme Court’s ruling that banned segregation on interstate travel. The sixteen riders were arrested multiple times along the way and Felmet was sentenced to three weeks on a chain gang in North Carolina.

Felmet was a lifelong peace activist and an advocate for civil liberties. He was a conscientious objector during World War II and refused to be inducted into the military. He went on to become an active leader of the Southern chapter of the Workers’ Defense League (WDL). He later ran for the US House in 1974 and the US Senate in 1978.

Extent

.25 Linear Feet (1 MB)

Abstract

Joe Felmet participated in the first “freedom ride” of the civil rights movement. This 1947 trip, known as the “Journey of Reconciliation,” was meant to test the Supreme Court’s ruling that banned segregation on interstate travel. The sixteen riders were arrested multiple times along the way and Felmet was sentenced to three weeks on a chain gang in North Carolina.

Felmet was a lifelong peace activist and an advocate for civil liberties. He was a conscientious objector during World War II and refused to be inducted into the military. He went on to become an active leader of the Southern chapter of the Workers’ Defense League (WDL). He later ran for the US House in 1974 and the US Senate in 1978.

His papers consist of articles and personal remembrances of his civil rights and free-speech activism and copies of FBI files on the WDL.

Collection is unprocessed.

Arrangement

Material has been minimally arranged and reflects its original order as acquired by the Archives. Subjects may be dispersed throughout the entire collection.

Acquisition

The Reuther Library received this collection in three successive deposits in 1992 and 1993.

Related Materials

Workers' Defense League Records

Processing History

Processed and finding aid written by Jared Natzke on August 14, 2012.
Title
Guide to the Joe Felmet Papers
Status
Completed
Author
Processed by Jared Natzke.
Date
2012-08-14
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Language of description note
English

Repository Details

Part of the Walter P. Reuther Library Repository

Contact:
5401 Cass Avenue
Detroit MI 48202 USA